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Thread: Religious symbolism in the Specter Ops narrative

  1. #1

    Default Religious symbolism in the Specter Ops narrative

    I posted this over on BGG, but in a sort of obscure location, but I thought it was worth discussing. Now that there's a forum here, I thought I'd repost it.

    I think the Christian imagery used in the fluff of the game is interesting - in the title you've got the Babel reference (a human mega-conglomerate that challenges the assumed destiny of humanity), in the rulebook it states about the name A.R.K. that 'the acronym references ancient illegal religious texts,' and that we see here (in the Hunter previews) that is 'Agents for a Reclaimed Kingdom' - that makes it pretty easy to view the Agent as a fundamentalist religious militant/terrorist fighting against the progress of technological post-humanism corporatists. I think that makes for a far more interesting dynamic from just 'good guy' and 'bad guy' tropes - which is touched on in The Puppet preview with 'Who is good? Who is bad? Is there clarity either way? Regardless of where your alliance lies, there is an infiltration of Raxxon, and the destiny of two forces hangs in the balance.' That's a cool ambiguity, and an interesting mirror to real world conflict (something that Metal Gear, a clear influence, also does very deftly).

  2. #2

    Default

    Other games in this style generally have a bad guy hiding and good guy hunters, so the sides not being so black and white intrigues me.

    Raxxon keeps the world safe, but now are exerting too much control, restricting freedom and performing experiments of questionable morality.

    A.R.K wants to free the world from Raxxon's control, but doesn't care about civilian casualties.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    It's really amazing what writers can sometimes do with just one page. The whole thing amazed me when I first laid eyes on the rulebook, and still amazes me even now. In fact, reading it over again makes me see things about the narrative I didn't see before.

    For instance, it put a completely new spin on the 5-player game after three readings.
    The night's shadow exists, not sleeping at all,
    The toil of the light is its only call,
    Behind the scenes lurking with shadowy gall,
    Its face never showing; height never too tall.

    Without a cry wherein dissent finds respite,
    The multitudes safer in the billowing light,
    More likely than not to strike evil at night,
    Then silently vanishing to be out of sight.

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